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President/CEO Number Crunchers® Accounting Inc. Learn how to just say stuff it to this bookkeeping thing with our 'Just Say: "Stuff It" To Bookkeeping program.

What Small Businesses can do to Survive the Pandemic

By Randall Orser | Budget , Covid-19 , Employees , Small Business

Businesses are doing all they can to navigate the unknown and to stay afloat during the pandemic, including laying off staff and reduced hours.  However up to 30% of small businesses are going to be unable to survive according to Jasmin Guenette from the CFIB.  

Here are a few actions that small businesses could take that might help them to deal with their situation.

  1. Check your reserves and insurance - talk with your accountant about your cash flow and reserves and how they can be best used.  Also check your insurance policy to see if there is anything that can be covered for lost income.  Even though many businesses have business interruption insurance, as this is a pandemic it does not count. 
  2. Have honest conversations with your staff about how you are going to try and keep them on the payroll but what might need to be done if your situation worsens.  
  3. Brainstorm with your staff for any ideas about how things could be done differently to save money and layoffs.
  4. Think about allowing your employees to work from home if it is possible in your business. If you can save on rent and utilities for your small office that could help your bottom line.
  5. Think about reducing business hours if possible.  This will give employees extra time to carry out cleaning and sanitizing for the office or if your are open to the public.
  6. If your business is open make sure that you follow all health and safety protocols to ensure a safe environment for your staff and the public.  Make sure all staff are fully trained and know what is expected of them.  
  7. Talk to your suppliers and lenders about stretching your payments and make sure that you take advantage of all the government, provincial and municipal help available to you.
  8. Get help from your accountant and business advisors to decide which government programs are most appropriate for your business.
  9. Continually think and plan ahead to see what you can do to minimize the impact of Covid-19 on your business. 
  10. Consult useful resources geared to small business:

From an article by Margaret Craig-Bourdin                              

How the Pandemic is Affecting Canadian Businesses

By Randall Orser | Budget , Covid-19 , Employees , Small Business

Even though many small businesses have fully or partially reopened the financial effects of the pandemic have been disastrous.  The serious decrease in revenue has meant that many have had to take on debt in order to stay afloat and many are calling for further government financial help.

The Canadian Federation of Independent Business (CFIB) has been tracking small businesses through the pandemic and the most recent survey of more than 4000 businesses found that 40% of them have seen revenues drop by 70% and & 70% have seen revenues drop by at least 30%.  

Even with the easing of restrictions by provinces and municipalities allowing for small businesses to reopen it is going to be a long time until sectors such as hospitality and entertainment will start to show a profit again.  Ted Mallet the vice president and chief economist of the CFIB has said it is more difficult for small businesses to operate now and despite being patronized by people who love unique products and services, many of these businesses will not survive.

The new reopening rules mean that restaurants are only able to have 50% of their normal capacity.  They usually have a profit margin of 3-5% when times are good so despite having curtsied pick up and home delivery it is difficult for many to continue to hang on. 

The CFIB survey found that 34% of respondents were behind on their major bills such as rent, credit card bills and critical suppliers, that number is 47% in the hospitality sector.  More than 25% said that their biggest worry was having to close their business, they are borrowing money to keep going but are building up debt that is going to be difficult to pay down.  In addition they have the costs associated with the changes necessary to operate their business post lockdown.

Though it is doom and gloom for many businesses, due to a change in consumer behaviour there are some business that are thriving, including home-gym products, those selling renovation products on-line, hobby shops and bike shops but these businesses are in the minority.

From an article by Ethan Rotberg CPA Canada

Will Covid-19 Relief Measures Affect my Taxes?

By Randall Orser | Business Income Taxes , Employees , Personal Finances , Personal Income Tax , Small Business

Accountants are not completely certain how the various government benefits being received by individuals and businesses during the pandemic will affect their tax bill next year.  However what will be certain is that if the benefit is a taxable benefit then you need to be prepared to pay tax on it in 2021 when you file your 2020 tax return.

As of April 2020 here is the information available from the CRA website and current legislation.

1. For Individuals

  • Any CERB payments are taxable, any payments that you have received will have to entered onto your tax return and an information slip will be available to you next year in MyAccount under Information slips so that you can enter your income in the correct boxes on your tax return.
  • One time additional payments for the Canada Child Benefit and the GST/HST tax credit are tax free and it is not expected that this will change in 2020.  The GST payment is also tax free and it is not expected that this will change.
  • If your student loan payments have been suspended then you will probably not have as much allowable student loan interest to claim on your income tax return as long as it is a qualifying student loan per CRA guidelines.
  • Deferred payments under mortgage support are added to the outstanding principal balance and are repaid over the life of the mortgage.  The mortgage support system is managed specifically by your lender and any deferral of payments is an arrangement between you and them.  The only impact on your taxes might be experienced by those who are self-employed who are able to claim business use or use of home expenses on their tax return.
  • The minimum withdrawal limit under the RRIF has been reduced by 25% for 2020 which means that if you take out less money you will pay less tax as money in your RRIF is only taxable when it is withdrawn.  

2. For Businesses

  • Tax credits and other benefits provided by the government still apply so any money received as a wage subsidy is considered government assistance and is included in the employers taxable income.  If you apply for the CEWS benefit you need to understand the tax implications of receiving this benefit.  The subsidy must be noted in your bookkeeping records and will become part of your business income that you report on your T2125.  
  • The TEWS or Temporary Wage Subsidy will be recorded in the same way.  The subsidies are a reduction in the amount that you send to the government for income taxes that you withheld from your employees and it becomes income for your business.  

It is paramount that you keep accurate accounting records throughout 2020 as they will be very important when you do your tax return in 2021.

From an article by Susan Watkin

How to Manage your Personal Finances During the Pandemic

By Randall Orser | Budget , Covid-19 , Personal Finances

The Covid-19 pandemic is causing financial stress for most Canadians as they are seeing their income reduced or eliminated and they are wondering how they will be able to pay their bills.

All levels of government have implemented emergency response plans including financial support and many financial institutions have stepped up to help by allowing people to defer payments and avoid penalties.  Here are some ways that you can reduce the financial impact of Covid-19.

The federal government started the $107 billion Covid-19 Emergency Economic Response Plan, with $52 billion direct support for employers and workers and $55 billion in tax deferrals for workers and businesses. Other financial assistance to families include:

  1.  A one-time increase to the GST tax benefit and increases to the Canada Child Benefit.
  2. A six-month interest free moratorium on the repayment of student loans'
  3. A 25% reduction in minimum withdrawals from a RRIF and variable benefit payments under a RRSP to help reduce the impact of volatile markets on senior's retirement savings.
  4. There are additional benefits to Canadians available from their province and municipality and they should visit the relevant websites for more details.
  5. Financial institutions are offering deferrals of mortgages up to six months for some customers as well as loans and relief on credit card payments and interest.

What can Canadians do to help themselves financially during the pandemic?

  • If you need to borrow money make sure that you consider the interest rates and how you will repay the loan, do not dig yourself too far into debt that it will be difficult to get out of once the pandemic is over.
  • If you have to tap into your emergency funds do it strategically, maximize all income sources first, create a more stringent budget and spending plan then consider tapping into your savings if you need to.  Always start with cash funds and TFSA's as you will not have to pay tax on that income and withdraw RRSP's on non-registered tax investments as a last resort.
  • If you are still working making saving money a priority after you have covered your necessary expenses this will help you should your job become affected.
  • Maximize help programs from utility companies that can include lower rates, deferred payments and flexible payment plans to assist residents and companies.  Many cell phone providers have removed data caps on internet and data plans and waived countrywide long distance fees.  They are also offering flexible payment plans.
  • Consider which bills you can eliminate such as subscriptions to digital services or retailers, and monthly donations.

It is important to continually assess your financial situation and if you can make changes that will help you to be more prepared for the future.

From an article by Sophie Nichols Jones 

How to Manage Flexible Work Arrangements for your Business

By Randall Orser | Employees , Small Business

Prior to the pandemic employees were already looking for new incentives to keep themselves motivated and engaged including the most popular one flexible working arrangements.

From an employers point of view offering flexible working means that there are some hurdles to be overcome. These can include the feeling that not making full use of the office space that they have invested in is a waste of money and secondly how can they make sure that their employees are being productive if they are not continually supervising them?

Due to the pandemic many more employees are working from home employers have had to change their mindset to embrace this.  For example instead of measuring the amount of hours spent at their desks they need to measure their employees productivity. Previous research into flexible working arrangements showed that employees have a greater degree of job satisfaction and higher productivity rates when they work away from the office.

It is true that flexible working arrangements do not work for every business especially if face-to-face contact with clients is important. However during the pandemic many businesses are getting around this by setting up Zoom meetings with their clients.  

Flexible Work Locations:

Offering flexible work arrangements will include work locations.  Employees can work in the office part of the week and from outside the office the remainder of the week whether it be at home or at another remote location of their choice.  Alternatively they can work entirely out of the office and just be in the office for special training, staff meetings or special events.  One advantage to this system is that employers do not have to hire talented workers who live locally instead they can hire from the best talent available in the industry wherever they live.

Flexible Schedules:

Instead of the 9-5 schedule required in the office employers can allow workers to set their own eight hour work day within a 12 hour period, or they can work 10 hour days for four days a week.  This schedule could be subject to change after a 3 or 6 month time period depending upon the requirements of the company.  

Job Sharing:

Job sharing allows two employees to share one full time job.  Sometimes an employer cannot find a person to work full time but can find two employees who can share the tasks which often happens in businesses that hire from an employee pool including students, mothers and seniors.  The benefit of this to the employer is that they often do not have to pay the same benefits to part time workers that they pay to their full time staff thereby saving on overhead.   The downside is that the employer will responsible for coordinating the work between the two employees to make sure that all the required tasks are completed and that everyone is on the same page.

Although flexible working comes with advantages and disadvantages for both employers and employees these arrangements were becoming more popular but the outbreak of Covid-19 has seen an  unprecedented move from office to home working.  It will now remain to be seen how many companies will continue to have their employees working remotely.

From an article by Alyssa Gregory

Four Things Not to Do While Working at Home During the Pandemic

By Randall Orser | Business , Cloud-computing , Employees , Freelancing

Many people and businesses were already considering working from home prior to the pandemic, but once social distancing became a reality it accelerated the movement from office to home working.  This has been a massive and sudden transition for everyone involved and it has brought about a new way of working for many of us.

While many thought that they would easily embrace working from home, many also found that it has a set of challenges to overcome.  So whether you are enjoying this new way of working or you are struggling here are a few things that you could do to make your working at home experience more positive and productive.

  1. Don't be Overwhelmed by Small Details  -  Don't be stressed by the sounds around you such as traffic, children and pets which can make your working conditions less than ideal. Other people are also dealing with these distractions, so when you make video or phone calls make light of your less than ideal working conditions to relieve your own anxiety.
  2.  Don't wear pyjamas all day and don't take video or phone calls while still in bed or in the washroom. As much as possible remain professional in your interactions with clients and peers. Get into the work mindset, dress appropriately and allow yourself the usual breaks that you would take if you were in the office.  Try and keep your work routine as normal as possible.
  3. Don't go silent, make sure you keep lines of communication open with other work colleagues and team members.  Set up regular check in times and video meetings this will provide you with regular updates and keep you feeling like you are still an important part of the team.
  4. Don't work in uncomfortable conditions.  It is easy to set yourself up with your laptop in bed or on uncomfortable chairs at the dining table but this will result in aches and pains which will distract you from the tasks that you are trying to complete.  Even if it is only a desk and chair in the corner of your bedroom, set yourself up with a comfortable and ergonomic workspace.

From Dr Laura Hambly on Global News

Planning for the Future of Your Business

By Randall Orser | Business , Retirement , Small Business

In 2011 the Canadian Federation of Independent Businesses conducted a poll that revealed that only 10% of small business owners had a succession plan.  As a small business owner you need to plan for your company's future change of ownership.  A careful exit strategy will help you to maintain the value of your company and your legacy and will ensure a smooth transition to a new owner.

A good succession plan will maintain positive relationships with employees and business partners that will help to bring a good sale price.  It will provide financial security for your heirs and other stakeholders as a plan is in place to deal with unexpected events such as death or illness.

Changes in ownership can be stressful for employees, suppliers and customers so your succession strategy needs to include communication plans to make sure that everyone is kept informed during the changeover thereby ensuring that the business continues to run smoothly.

If you expect to be leaving your business within the next five years you need to start planning right away.  Even if your business is fairly new you need to have a plan in place should the unexpected happen.  

Susan Ward a Canadian business writer says that 70% of businesses do not survive the transition from the founder to the second generation due to poor or no planning, and she offers the following tips for succession planning:

  1. Start business succession planning early, five years in advance is good, ten years is better. Think about including a business exit strategy right into your initial business plan.
  2. Make sure that you involve your family in all business succession planning discussions.  This will help to ensure that everyone is aware of your plans.  It is important to pay attention to the personal feelings, ambitions and goals of all members of the family who might be directly involved with the succession.
  3. Plan realistically, if your children do not have the skills or have no interest in taking over the company from you then consider a different family member who might be more capable.  If there is no one in the family to take over the business then you should consider selling it.  Whatever you decide it should be in the best interests of the business that you have worked hard to make successful.  
  4. Don't plan for everyone to have an equal share in the business.  It is fairer for those who have an active part in running the business to have a larger share of the ownership of the business than non active family members.  You could also transfer complete ownership to your chosen successor and make other financial arrangements for other members of the family.
  5. Make sure that you work with and train your successor for a few years so that they are ready and able to take over the reins should the need arise.  It can be difficult to teach someone your business skills and share decision making but it will be in the best interests of the business. 
  6. Make sure that you get outside help with your succession planning from your lawyer, accountant and financial planner.  They will help you to put together a good plan as well as plan asset transfer tax strategies to minimize taxes due upon your death. 

​From an article by Susan Ward and Freedom 55 Financial

Covid-19 Now is the Time to get Serious About Your Financial Wellness

By Randall Orser | Budget , Personal Finances , Personal Income Tax , Retirement

A survey done for the MNP Consumer Debt Index when the Covid-19 pandemic started showed that 49% of Canadians asked were $200 or less away from being able to settle their bills and 25% of these people said they were already behind on their payments. In this uncertain economic environment are many are unable to realize their life goals and some even face bankruptcy.  

Lack of financial security is a big cause of stress, lack of sleep and tension in relationships as people and couples are unsure about what their future will look like.  In fact 41% of Canadians say that money concerns are the biggest cause of stress in their life  The fear of the financial impact of the pandemic is a greater contributor to mental health than getting sick or losing a loved one.

This information begs the question "Why are people finding themselves in this financial predicament? There are a number of answers to this question including costs rising faster than wages which has caused many to incur debt, but the big reason has to be ignoring the necessity of financial planning.  Financial planning includes saving for the future, retirement and making informed financial decisions and living within one's means and building a emergency fund. The pandemic brings to the forefront this long avoided issue, it is time to become responsible for your financial health. 

Many use the lack of financial knowledge as a reason for not planning. This is no excuse for avoiding the issue as financial literacy can be gained from books, seminars, blogs, websites and from working with a financial planner, there is lots of help out there.  Here are some tips that may help your immediate financial situation:

  • Make a new financial plan, your income may have been reduced and you need to revise your budget and priorities accordingly.  If you are not able to pay your bills, you should not be contributing to your child's college fund making contributions to your RRSP.   
  • Don't worry about paying down debts quickly, make minimum payments and put the rest into an emergency fund.  Your emergency fund should be enough to cover three to six months of  expenses should your income be severely reduced.
  • Take advantage of the help that your bank may be offering such as reduced interest rates on credit cards, deferred mortgage payments and low interest loans or lines of credit to pay off higher interest debts.
  • Instead of making plans for the next 10 or 20 years make your financial plans cover a shorter period of time. 

Making the decision to start taking control of your finances or making your financial goals more realistic will help you to deal with the stress that the pandemic is causing.

See our previous articles for more information:

​Financial Skills you Should Have Learned in High School

Reasons why you Should Budget your Money

Charging PST on Online Sales

By Randall Orser | On-line sales , Sales Taxes , Small Business

If you are a business that does online sales have to collect and remit taxes just the same as if you had a bricks and mortar business.  This means that you will need to charge and remit other province's sales taxes and different rules in different provinces can make this process complicated.  

Businesses need to register as a provincial sales tax vendor with each province where they will be doing business. Unfortunately, there is little that can be done get around this additional paperwork and bookkeeping, except for to limit the provinces where you ship goods, for example if businesses only sell products to consumers in their own province or if they only sell non-taxable goods and services.

Provincial sales taxes vary by province. There is also the goods and services tax and some provinces use the harmonized sales tax which combines the GST with their provincial sales tax.   For businesses selling only within their own province or territory they only need to follow the rules for their province, but for those selling to other provinces they must charge taxes according to the rules in those provinces.  

  • In BC if the business specifically targets customers in BC through advertising or similar means that they are targeting customers in that province and they are therefore expected to collect and remit PST.
  • In Manitoba out of province businesses must register as a vendor if they solicit sales, the orders originate, the goods are used or goods are shipped to that province.
  • In Saskatchewan all businesses selling online order to customers there are expected to collect and remit PST.
  • In Quebec out of province businesses must register before selling goods to residents there.
  • In Alberta, Nunavut and the Yukon there is no PST.
  • New Brunswick, Newfoundland and Labrador, the Northwest Territories, Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island and Ontario charge the HST.
  • BC, Manitoba, Quebec, and Saskatchewan charge the GST and a PST.


From an article by Susan Ward

How to Close your GST Account with the CRA

By Randall Orser | Sales Taxes , Small Business

There could be a few different reasons why the time may have come for you to close your GST account with the CRA.

  • If your total taxable revenue (before expenses) has dropped below $30,000 in the last four consecutive calendar quarters then you can apply to regain your small supplier status and no longer collect and remit GST.  However, you must have been registered for GST for at least one year before they will close your account.
  • If you sell or close your business
  • If you no longer make taxable supplies
  • If you are in receivership, a receiver appointed by the courts may take control of your existing GST account until the closure of the business, and your GST account will also be closed at that time.
  • If you are filing for bankruptcy you will need to send copies of the court issued bankruptcy documents to the tax services office.
  • If you are merging or amalgamating with another business.  In this case the CRA may either issue a new business number or allow the reuse of the existing business number.
  • If the business is a sole proprietorship and the owner dies, the heirs or agents will be required to close the account and file a final return.
  • If the business is a partnership and one partner leaves or dies.  Depending on the circumstances the existing number may be reused or a new one might be required.

To close your account you need to complete form RC145 Request to Close Business Number Accounts and send it to your tax services office.  You must also make sure that you file any outstanding GST returns for the period up to the date the account is closed and pay any remittances due.  If you are closing the business you are assumed to be disposing of the assets of the business and that you have collected GST on these sales.  You will need to determine the fair market value of these assets and report this on the return.

If you do not close the account the CRA will assume that you are still in business and will expect you to file returns.  If your business is closed or inactive you can file nil returns until your business starts up again, but if you continue to file nil returns for several years the CRA may contact you to ask if you want to close the account.  If you stop filing returns and don't close the account the CRA will require you to file for the missing dates and if you do not respond you can expect to receive a phone call or visit from from a CRA officer.  If your business is still open and you are not filing returns you will be prosecuted under the Excise Tax Act and you will be liable for penalties and interest.

From an article by Susan Ward

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