Category Archives for "Covid-19"

What Small Businesses can do to Survive the Pandemic

By Randall Orser | Budget , Covid-19 , Employees , Small Business

Businesses are doing all they can to navigate the unknown and to stay afloat during the pandemic, including laying off staff and reduced hours.  However up to 30% of small businesses are going to be unable to survive according to Jasmin Guenette from the CFIB.  

Here are a few actions that small businesses could take that might help them to deal with their situation.

  1. Check your reserves and insurance - talk with your accountant about your cash flow and reserves and how they can be best used.  Also check your insurance policy to see if there is anything that can be covered for lost income.  Even though many businesses have business interruption insurance, as this is a pandemic it does not count. 
  2. Have honest conversations with your staff about how you are going to try and keep them on the payroll but what might need to be done if your situation worsens.  
  3. Brainstorm with your staff for any ideas about how things could be done differently to save money and layoffs.
  4. Think about allowing your employees to work from home if it is possible in your business. If you can save on rent and utilities for your small office that could help your bottom line.
  5. Think about reducing business hours if possible.  This will give employees extra time to carry out cleaning and sanitizing for the office or if your are open to the public.
  6. If your business is open make sure that you follow all health and safety protocols to ensure a safe environment for your staff and the public.  Make sure all staff are fully trained and know what is expected of them.  
  7. Talk to your suppliers and lenders about stretching your payments and make sure that you take advantage of all the government, provincial and municipal help available to you.
  8. Get help from your accountant and business advisors to decide which government programs are most appropriate for your business.
  9. Continually think and plan ahead to see what you can do to minimize the impact of Covid-19 on your business. 
  10. Consult useful resources geared to small business:

From an article by Margaret Craig-Bourdin                              

How the Pandemic is Affecting Canadian Businesses

By Randall Orser | Budget , Covid-19 , Employees , Small Business

Even though many small businesses have fully or partially reopened the financial effects of the pandemic have been disastrous.  The serious decrease in revenue has meant that many have had to take on debt in order to stay afloat and many are calling for further government financial help.

The Canadian Federation of Independent Business (CFIB) has been tracking small businesses through the pandemic and the most recent survey of more than 4000 businesses found that 40% of them have seen revenues drop by 70% and & 70% have seen revenues drop by at least 30%.  

Even with the easing of restrictions by provinces and municipalities allowing for small businesses to reopen it is going to be a long time until sectors such as hospitality and entertainment will start to show a profit again.  Ted Mallet the vice president and chief economist of the CFIB has said it is more difficult for small businesses to operate now and despite being patronized by people who love unique products and services, many of these businesses will not survive.

The new reopening rules mean that restaurants are only able to have 50% of their normal capacity.  They usually have a profit margin of 3-5% when times are good so despite having curtsied pick up and home delivery it is difficult for many to continue to hang on. 

The CFIB survey found that 34% of respondents were behind on their major bills such as rent, credit card bills and critical suppliers, that number is 47% in the hospitality sector.  More than 25% said that their biggest worry was having to close their business, they are borrowing money to keep going but are building up debt that is going to be difficult to pay down.  In addition they have the costs associated with the changes necessary to operate their business post lockdown.

Though it is doom and gloom for many businesses, due to a change in consumer behaviour there are some business that are thriving, including home-gym products, those selling renovation products on-line, hobby shops and bike shops but these businesses are in the minority.

From an article by Ethan Rotberg CPA Canada

How to Manage your Personal Finances During the Pandemic

By Randall Orser | Budget , Covid-19 , Personal Finances

The Covid-19 pandemic is causing financial stress for most Canadians as they are seeing their income reduced or eliminated and they are wondering how they will be able to pay their bills.

All levels of government have implemented emergency response plans including financial support and many financial institutions have stepped up to help by allowing people to defer payments and avoid penalties.  Here are some ways that you can reduce the financial impact of Covid-19.

The federal government started the $107 billion Covid-19 Emergency Economic Response Plan, with $52 billion direct support for employers and workers and $55 billion in tax deferrals for workers and businesses. Other financial assistance to families include:

  1.  A one-time increase to the GST tax benefit and increases to the Canada Child Benefit.
  2. A six-month interest free moratorium on the repayment of student loans'
  3. A 25% reduction in minimum withdrawals from a RRIF and variable benefit payments under a RRSP to help reduce the impact of volatile markets on senior's retirement savings.
  4. There are additional benefits to Canadians available from their province and municipality and they should visit the relevant websites for more details.
  5. Financial institutions are offering deferrals of mortgages up to six months for some customers as well as loans and relief on credit card payments and interest.

What can Canadians do to help themselves financially during the pandemic?

  • If you need to borrow money make sure that you consider the interest rates and how you will repay the loan, do not dig yourself too far into debt that it will be difficult to get out of once the pandemic is over.
  • If you have to tap into your emergency funds do it strategically, maximize all income sources first, create a more stringent budget and spending plan then consider tapping into your savings if you need to.  Always start with cash funds and TFSA's as you will not have to pay tax on that income and withdraw RRSP's on non-registered tax investments as a last resort.
  • If you are still working making saving money a priority after you have covered your necessary expenses this will help you should your job become affected.
  • Maximize help programs from utility companies that can include lower rates, deferred payments and flexible payment plans to assist residents and companies.  Many cell phone providers have removed data caps on internet and data plans and waived countrywide long distance fees.  They are also offering flexible payment plans.
  • Consider which bills you can eliminate such as subscriptions to digital services or retailers, and monthly donations.

It is important to continually assess your financial situation and if you can make changes that will help you to be more prepared for the future.

From an article by Sophie Nichols Jones