Category Archives for "Happy New Year"

5 Early Steps to Get Ready for Tax Time

By Randall Orser | Happy New Year , Personal Finances , Personal Income Tax , Small Business

HAPPY NEW YEAR

While you are nursing that hangover or catching up on sleep might not be the best time to remind you that the last year is over and that you need to start thinking about filing your taxes! but here it is!

You are probably not too excited about filing your taxes but look at this as a great opportunity to review your finances and getting organized early will save you the pain and hassle of doing everything at the last minute.  

Here are some simple steps to help you to reduce your stress and get yourself on track for filing your taxes by the end of April or even a little earlier!

  1. Make an Account List:  Start by making a list of all your financial accounts. If you have a small business, you need to create both a personal and a business account list.  Include bank accounts, credit cards, investments, retirement, and every other financial account you have. Unused but still open accounts should be included on your list.  If these accounts are old and inactive now is a good time to close them. Make sure all of your accounts are accounted for in your bookkeeping software, so you don’t miss any transactions. If you forget to write off an eligible business expense, that is money you are giving money to the CRA that should be in your pocket!
  2. Get your Bookkeeping up to date:  If you have been ignoring your bookkeeping for a while, it’s time to get caught up! You’ll need copies of your annual income statement, which is the core document used to prepare your business taxes.  You might also need your balance sheet and depending on the registration of the business you run, you may also need to list assets and liabilities on your taxes, which comes from the balance sheet. Remember that errors in your bookkeeping can lead to errors on your taxes. You don’t want to pay too much and lose out on profits you should keep. Similarly, you don’t want to underreport and find yourself on thewrong side of an audit, fines, and penalties. Making sure your books are done, and done accurately, is key to tax season success.  If bookkeeping is not your thing, it might be a good idea to enlist the help of a professional bookkeeper who will keep your records in order for you so that everything is ready for tax time.
  3. Put Together a Tax Form Checklist:  Make a list of all the sources that you expect to get tax forms from.  These can be from bank accounts, investments, educational institutions and the government. You can put your checklist in an Excel spreadsheet or Google Sheets for easier access using your phone. Whichever method you use, make sure you have all the forms you need before you file your taxes, or you will have to file an update to your return if something is missed and this can be a big hassle.
  4. Create a Tax Form Folder (digital and physical):  When the forms arrive, it is easy to set them aside to open later then misplace them.  Train yourself to open everything right away and file it in a folder either physically or digitally.  You can use Dropbox to store digital copies and add in scanned paper copies so that you have everything together.
  5. Choose your Filing Method:  Decide whether you want to do your taxes yourself online, or you want to hire a bookkeeper or accountant to do them for you. Think about how knowledgeable or comfortable you are about doing your taxes.  If the answer if not very, you should use a professional to avoid making mistakes or missing deductions.

Taxes don't Have to be Terrible! 

You may dread tax season, but taxes don’t have to be a horrible part of your finances and your business. You do them every year, so find ways to make the process easier and faster.  Preparation well in advance can be the key to a successful filing and just think how satisfying it is when it is all done for another year! 

From an article by Eric Rosenberg

Have you Made Your New Year Financial Resolutions Yet?

By Randall Orser | Happy New Year , Investments , Personal Finances , Personal Income Tax

Looking forward to the new year, some of us like to make New Year’s Resolutions – some we keep, some we don’t, but how many of us make Financial New Year’s Resolutions?  It might be something that you want to think about for 2019.  

Resolve to do Better– we all start off the new year gung-ho about our New Year’s Resolutions then we get disheartened when we don’t see instant results, and we fall off the wagon.  The solution is to start small and be happy with small results rather than expecting a major overnight change in your money situation.  Resolve to manage your money better than you did last year. 

Identify Your Financial Goals– before you can make any progress towards your goals you need to know what they are – repay your car loan? buy a new home? retire early? To increase your chance of success you need to be specific about your goals then outline a plan of attack. Look at your financial performance last year and be honest - did you overspend or overborrow? Reconsider your financial mistakes and resolve to do better in 2019 and it is important to continue to review your progress periodically throughout the year.   

Get a Support System, your spouse should always be part of your team as you should be working together towards your financial goals.  Taking a personal finance class together will help you recognise where you are damaging your finances.  Share money saving ideas with family and friends.

Here are the Five Main Financial Goals that you should consider for the new year.

Start to Budget – Start tracking your spending because before you can commit to sticking to a budget you need to know exactly where your money is going, see where you are overspending and plan to reduce the cash leak in that area.  Use Personal Finance software to help you to easily track your finances.  

Get out of Debt – this is a key goal to taking control of your finances.  Prioritize your debts – organize your debts by their interest rate, pay them off in order of the highest ones first.  Fast track your debt payoff goals, instead of saying “I am going to pay off all my debts this year” which is a big goal, commit to contributing a little more to your monthly payments.  An extra $50 a month can make a big difference.  Think about ways of raising extra money to pay off debts maybe selling unwanted items or taking as second job.

Start Saving Money 

  • Reduce your grocery bill and stop eating out.
  • Find ways to save on utilities, cut ties with cable and start streaming.
  • Close any bank or credit accounts you don’t need, this could save you bank charges.  
  • Call your credit card company to try and negotiate a lower interest rate.
  • Boost your retirement savings and set a monthly savings goal.  
  • Automate as many monthly payments as possible. In this way you make payments without thinking about it, so it becomes a habit to expect these deductions from your bank account each month.  
  • Commit to no-spend days or weekends.  Make this a time when no money at all leaves your bank account, eat at home, find free entertainment and skip shopping.  
  • Get healthy without joining a gym – try doing on-line exercise videos for free and get outside for walks and hikes.  
  • Collect your change – try and use cash to pay for things and keep your change. Throw it into a jar. It is amazing how much you can accumulate over a year, and this money can go towards paying off a debt.

Learn about Money and Finances - Subscribe to a financial podcast (Randall does one every Friday at 11am).  Increase your financial knowledge by listening to the experts.  Alternatively commit to reading at least one personal finance book this year (there are lots to choose from at your local library for free!)   

Learn about investing or re-evaluate your investment portfolio – sit down with your financial advisor to see if your current plan is meeting your goals or if you need to make changes.  Make it a goal to invest a certain amount each month.

Some great ideas to get you started on the road to financial recovery, good luck in 2019.

Happy New Year!

By Randall Orser | Happy New Year

Wow, it’s hard to believe that 2017 is coming to a close already as it feels we just started it a few weeks ago. I do hope your 2017 has been a good one, and that 2018 is even better.

The Finns do it the weirdest

In Finland, each new year family and friends gather to burn metal in a pan for a ritual called "molybdomancy". The Finns inspect the shadows the metal casts by candlelight, as those shapes are supposed to predict the future. Although, this metal is customarily called “tin,” it’s actually sometimes lead, which, among other things, is known to spark severe mental illness... that might explain why this ritual has persisted for hundreds of years. And while that's all pretty well and weird, the Finns aren't alone: Ecuadorians burn paper-filled scarecrows, the Swiss drop ice cream on the floor, and people in Siberia plunge into frozen lakes while carrying a tree trunk -- all to ring in the new year.

The 8th most common New Year's resolution is to improve a relationship

Only around 40% of us will even make a resolution. While nearly all of those vows err on the side of improvement (e.g. start exercising, improve your finances, quit smoking), the 8th most common resolution is to get along better with someone else, according to a 2012 Harris poll. So what’s the number one New Year’s resolution? Weight loss (duh).

We celebrate on Jan. 1 because Julius Caesar said so

Why does the New Year begin on January 1st? Because our contemporary (Gregorian) calendar is based on the Julian one (named after none other than the Big Ceas) and he made January month numero uno (which is latin for "number one" btw).

But New Year's used to be on March 20th

The first indication of a new year’s celebrations crop up around 2000 BC in the Middle East. Or, as its known in 9th grade history class, “Mesopotamia". At that time (2000 BC, not 9th grade), each year began on March 20th, AKA the vernal (or Spring) equinox. That's the one where the sun crosses directly over the equator. Nowadays, celebrating New Year’s is illegal in much of the same region (e.g. Saudi Arabia). Fertile crescent? More like festive crescent!

January is named after a god with two faces

We have ancient Rome to thank for our year beginning in January. The Roman god the month is named after, Janus, was described as having two faces. That's not a catty put-down either. We mean he literally had double the mug. When depicted in ancient Roman art, one of Janus' faces looks forward, while the other looks back. You know, like how you do on New Year's. Mad metaphorical.

Southerners eat black-eyed peas on New Year's Day for good luck

Thought to have been derived from a Jewish New Year (Rosh Hashanah) custom, Americans in the South annually gobble black-eyed peas. Most Southerners (and many historians) maintain the tradition began to take hold stateside when the first Shepari Jews moved to Georgia in the 1730s. By the end of the Civil War, the Rosh Hashanah tradition had evolved into a widespread practice in the South, enjoyed by both Jews and gentiles.

The ball drop is over 100 years old

Before Times Square was the home of M&Ms, naked cowboys, and hard-haggling middle-aged men in Elmo costumes, it was a classy little bit of town, called One Times Square. Its first New Year’s ball dropping took place December 31, 1907. Since then, it’s tumbled down every year (save for a couple during World War II). Over a million-people flock to watch every December.

The New Year's kiss has been around since the Middle Ages

Historians reckon that the New Year’s kiss is derived from either German and English folklore (it was a tradition in both). Both customs contended this: the first person you encounter in a new year will set that year’s tone. So, if the person you encounter likes you enough to make out with you, things are looking pretty good. Or maybe you're just looking pretty good.

The only other people who still sing "Auld Lang Syne" are Boy Scouts

The lyrics of Auld Lang Syne (which we can't abbreviate because ice buckets) are from a 1788 poem by an old Scot called Robert Burns. Well, Burns attributed the lyrics to unwritten remarks by an unnamed old man. But a few graphs of it very closely (near verbatim) resemble a poem called "Old Long Syne" written in 1711 by a man called James Watson. It's assumed Burns at least wrote the rest of it. Things like: Is thy sweet Heart now grown so cold, that loving Breast on thine. Catchy. Apparently, the Boy Scouts of America sing it at the end of their jamborees. Now you want a "Things you didn't know about Boy Scouts", right!?

Nearly a quarter of you are gonna PTFO

About 22% of Americans cop to passing out before the clock strikes 12. Unless you’re Cinderella and you gotta buck before your whip turns pumpkin, then there's no excuse. Being conscious to recognize midnight is the whole reason there was even a party, man. That and eating all the pigs in a blanket.