Don’t File Late, Watch That Date!

By Randall Orser | Personal Income Tax

tax-return-tnToo many people today are filing their tax returns, GST/HST returns, and other government remittances late. This is costing Canadian taxpayers millions of dollars every year. The government loves it, and, though I can’t confirm it, does probably make as much from penalties and interest as they do from the taxes collected.

You must pay attention to due dates for when returns and other remittances are due. Your personal income tax return is due by April 30th of the next year, so if you’re filing for 2013 the return is due by April 30th 2014. For self-employed/partnerships then the return is due by June 15th of the following year. Remember though that any income taxes or Canada Pension Plan amounts owing are due by April 30th. This is why it’s best to make installments.

For the businessperson, there’s GST/HST, payroll, corporate tax (for those who are incorporated), and PST (Provincial Sales Tax or sometimes referred to as RST—Retail Sales Tax). These all have different due dates and penalties that accrue when they are not filed on time. We’ll talk about GST/HST and payroll.

GST/HST

For GST/HST you file either annually, quarterly (every three months) or monthly. For annual filers, the return is usually due by June 15th for self-employed/partnerships (though any amount owing is due by April 30th); for corporations the GST/HST return is usually due 3 months after the cut-off. For quarterly and monthly filers, the return and any amount owing is due by the end of the following month.

If you’re self-employed/partnership, and you file quarterly, you generally follow the calendar year. You’re returns are January to March due April, April to June due July, July to September due October, and October to December due January (the returns are due by the end of that month).

As an annual filer, if you owe more than $3,000, you must pay installment payments during the year. This is done quarterly, and the easiest solution is to take the prior year and divide by four. If you believe your balance owing will be less or more you can adjust the installment payments accordingly.

There are penalties for failure to file, failure to file upon demand, failure to file electronically if you are required to do so, and failure to accurately report information. These can add up.

Payroll

Well, this is where the penalties can really add up. You not only can get a penalty for failing to remit your regular payroll remittance every month, but also you’re T4s.

The penalty for remitting your regular payroll remittance late is:

  • 3% if the amount is one to three days late;
  • 5% if it is four or five days late;
  • 7% if it is six or seven days late; and
  • 10% if it is more than seven days late or if no amount is remitted.

This can add up if your payroll remittance is in the thousands. Your payroll remittance is due the 15th of the month following deductions taken. CRA goes by when the payroll is paid, not the cut-off date. For example: You’re payroll is cut-off on the 28th of September but not paid until October 4th. In this case, the deductions are considered paid in October not September, so the remittance is not due until November 15th.

For T4s, it can get real nasty when you file these late. Here’s what you can be fined for not filing your T4s on time:

Number of informationreturns (slips) Penalty (per day) Maximum penalty
1 – 50 $10 $1,000
51 – 500 $15 $1,500
501 – 2,500 $25 $2,500
2,501 – 10,000 $50 $5,000
10,001 or more $75 $7,500

 

If that doesn’t scare you, I’m not sure what would. This can be costly for a small business.

As you can see filing your remittances on time is very important. You need to know when you’re remittances are due, or at least ensure your bookkeeper/accountant knows when they are due. You are much better off to file your remittances one time, and have a balance owing, than to just wait until you have the funds. I have found that CRA can be accommodating when it comes to balances owing. I just helped a client get is large balance of GST/HST owing spread out over 8 months. Unfortunately, he waited to long to get help filing and will end up owing thousands in penalties and interest.

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