How do You Measure up on Making the Hard Decisions?

By Randall Orser | Small Business

Running your small business can be one demanding enterprise. Your dilemma is that you have control, but that is both a blessing and a curse. You have the joy of deciding how your company grows and develops, but you are also answerable for everything that happens, good or bad. If you let it, this kind of pressure can douse the flames of passion. You can make things mentally and emotionally easier for you to deal with by using the following in your approach to decision-making.

Limit Your Options

The old adage analysis paralysis can easily set in. That’s why you should look at having your offers have as few options as possible. The more choices the customer has to decide on then the less likely they are to make any choice at all.

The more options you have available to you, the harder it will be to take a path. Your best bet is to limit options is to raise or refine your standards. The more specific your needs or desired outcomes, the less options you’ll have to pick from.

Use Your Numbers

Not sure which way to go, then your best to approach the issue objectivity. Rather than just go with your gut, check your numbers. Focus on the measurable metrics and forget what isn’t quantifiable. 

While this can take more time and slow down your decision-making process, it also makes your decision more tenable as well as improving the quality. As an example, you have two manufacturers to choose from and it’s a hard choice, however, go to the numbers and which one gives you a better deal when it comes down to brass tacks.

Think Long Game

Fear is one of the biggest barriers to quick decision making. The idea that your business can be hamstrung by a single mistake is a common one, fortunately it’s not an accurate one. Although a single mistake can hurt, it’s not the death knell you may make it out to be.

Some decisions won’t always expose their true nature early on. What’s working now for your small business won’t necessarily work in the future. On the other hand, that bad decision you make today that negatively affects your business may not necessarily do so in the future. Don’t focus too much on your mistakes or their immediate effects. They’re not necessarily representative of how things will turn out.

Manage Decision Fatigue

Nothing withstands constant pressure. Exercise one muscle frequently in a short period of time, and it’ll fatigue, no matter how strong it is. The same effect happens on your brain when making a lot of decisions, fatigue. Deciding what to have for lunch, which is a simple choice, can add to the barrage of stress bearing down on your brain.

By delegating those small-impact decisions to other people can keep that stress at bay. You need to focus on the big decisions. If you can reduce something to a habit or pattern, do so. Save your energy for important choices.

Not Your Problem

You can easily miss the forest for the trees when you’re deep in the woods, and that’s where you’re at when trying to solve your own problems. Especially challenging decisions can leave you lacking perspective. Taking a step back and removing yourself from the situation can be the best thing to do. Pretend it’s not your problem.

If you had a friend facing this decision point, think about what advice you’d give them. That seems silly but pretending that it’s someone else’s problem to resolve can jar your mind enough to recover your perspective.

You must nurture decisiveness as it’s a key trait to decision making. You won’t be able to run your business if you can’t make decisions quickly. It will take a lot time, practice, and effort, but it’ll be worth it if it makes you a leader who can make choices without freezing.

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About the Author

President/CEO Number Crunchers® Accounting Inc. Learn how to just say stuff it to this bookkeeping thing with our 'Just Say: "Stuff It" To Bookkeeping program.