Reasons Why Start-ups are Riskier Than Franchise Businesses

By Randall Orser | Investments

Thinking about starting your own business?  It is always a risky thing to do and most budding entrepreneurs will do a risk assessment to determine how much financial risk they are willing and able to take. One big consideration is whether to launch a startup business or buy into a franchise.  They both have their pros and cons which mostly involve the potential business person.  Start-ups appeal to people who want to make their own decisions about how the company operates and those who want to turn their big idea into a million-dollar business. 

However, risk assessments have shown that undeniably start-ups are much riskier than investing in a franchise.  Here are some reasons why:

  1. In a start-up you have to build your own brand from scratch.  This is difficult, time consuming and costly and most new business owners lack the resources to do the work so consequently they are only able to grow their business within their own circle of family, friends, and acquaintances or their business fails.  Franchises come with an already built brand which is familiar to a wider audience, this includes slogans, logos, signage, buildouts, team apparel and more.  This means that prospective customers are already familiar with the product or service making it much easier to make sales right from the start.
  2. When you start your own business, you may get lots of advice, but if this is your first time in business you may make mistakes that can be costly.  If you have a franchise, you can draw on the advice and experience of other owners who have experienced the same problems or had the same questions.  The franchise business will teach you how to do things the best and most profitable way.
  3. If you start your own business you have to write your own business plan, sell your idea to prospective investors and banks and try to estimate how much money you will need to establish your business as well as to survive while it is getting off the ground.  If you buy into a franchise, they will help you to draw up your business plan and can often assist with finding financing.   They will also be able to let you know exactly how much money you will need to become a franchise owner.
  4. You will need supplies as well as legal and accounting support to operate your business.  If you buy a franchise can often offer this kind of support in-house or recommend third-party vendors.  In addition, they can often secure products and services for franchisees at a discount due to the volume that they purchase.
  5.  Franchise owners have a support system from corporate teams, regional directors and from fellow owners that can be critical to the success of their business.  Other owners have been there and can offer detailed help to work through problems.  When you start your own business, you are pretty much on your own.
  6.  Starting your own business requires learning how to choose the best location, hire and train staff, market your business and do bookkeeping.  As most new owners are busy doing the work and are not experienced in doing these tasks the new business can easily fail.  Franchise businesses have operational systems already in place and are able to clearly explain to prospective franchisees the types of skills they will need to be a successful owner.

Franchise businesses do come with their own risks and there are no guarantees of success. However, for a prospective new owner who lacks business knowledge and experience a franchise business is a good idea to mitigate risks.

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About the Author

President/CEO Number Crunchers® Accounting Inc. Learn how to just say stuff it to this bookkeeping thing with our 'Just Say: "Stuff It" To Bookkeeping program.