Travel Booking Scams and how to Avoid Them

By Randall Orser | Personal Finances

Summer is here and it’s time to think about getting away from it all.  We all know how scammers are trying to trick us at home, but did you know that they are also busy trying to scam you out of your trip? In a report from the Association of British Travel Agents Fraudsters conned UK holidaymakers out of approx. $12 million Can in 2018 with an average financial loss of approx. $2800 Can per person. Fraudsters are using more and more sophisticated methods to target destinations and popular times of the year when demand is high, and availability is limited. People are looking for a good deal, and once they find out that they have been conned, it can be difficult and expensive to get a legitimate booking.

Here are five major booking scams to watch for and how to avoid them:

1. Fake Websites That Look Real

About 53% of travel scams are related to the sale of airline tickets.  This can include booking on a fake site, receiving an imitation ticket or paying for a ticket that you never get.  These types of scams are also common with accommodation and package deals.  Often people do not check that a site is authentic before booking and some don’t even know how to check.  

Before paying a deposit make sure the web address is legitimate.  Check the domain name, .net or .org are rarely used for shopping sites.   Also check for https:// (rather than http://) which should always be on the payment page showing that the site is secure.  Other clues to a fraudulent website are misspellings, wrong words or characters, fuzzy or low-resolution pictures of logos, trade associations and payment and card companies.

2. Being Directed Away from Trusted Sites for Payment

Fraudsters lure people away from trusted sites and request payment on a separate site, often offering a better price.  Alarm bells should also ring if you are asked for payment via an online bank transfer.

You should never pay by online bank transfer, always pay by credit card as you will get more protection from fraud.  If you are scammed, paying by credit card will give you a better chance of getting your money back.   Keep all communications on trusted websites.

3. Avoid Pop-ups Advertising “Amazing Deals”

Unsolicited promotional emails can often look legit but will sometimes click through to a fake website.  Watch out for the tell-tale signs of a fake website, and definitely avoid fake competition scams, like the current ones by phone for Westjet and Marriott Hotels.

Validate deals by logging on directly to trusted websites.  Once you know that the deal is valid use that trusted website to make your bookings.  

4. Fake Accommodation Listings

Accommodation bookings account for 25% of all reported scams.  These scams can include luxury villas at discounted rates. Sometimes the villas do not exist and other times they are offered without the owner’s knowledge.  These scams happen most often with accommodations in France and Spain.

It pays to do your research to make sure that this is a real listing, contact the owner or agent directly and again minimize risks by booking through a trusted platform. 

5. Using Unsecured Networks While Away

Booking travel when away from home can be a major security concern as your private data can be exposed via clouds and wi-fi.  The majority of vacationers use wi-fi during their trip and many do not check the security of their internet connection despite getting pop-up warnings. Public wi-fi includes both secured and unsecured networks.  Unsecured networks can be connected without the use of a password or login.  Secured networks require you to register for an account or password before connecting.   

Avoid sharing sensitive data or bank information over unsecured networks. Consider using a VPN that will encrypt your data and to help keep your connection secure.

From an article in The Guardian International Edition

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About the Author

President/CEO Number Crunchers® Accounting Inc. Learn how to just say stuff it to this bookkeeping thing with our 'Just Say: "Stuff It" To Bookkeeping program.