What Is The Disability Tax Credit (DTC)?

By Randall Orser | Personal Income Tax

DollarsThe disability amount is a non-refundable tax credit used to reduce income tax payable on your income tax and benefit return. This amount includes a supplement for persons under18 years of age at the end of the year. All or part of this amount may be transferred to your spouse or common-law partner, or another supporting person.

The disability amount is for those individuals who have a severe and prolonged impairment in physical or mental functions. You do have to file a form, of course, it is government and they thrive on paperwork. You file a T2201 Disability Tax Credit Certificate with Canada Revenue Agency (CRA); a qualified practitioner must fill out the medical portion of the form.

You are eligible for the DTC only if CRA approves the T2201 form. A qualified practitioner has to complete and certify that you have a severe and prolonged impairment and its effects. To find out if you may be eligible for the DTC, check out the self-assessment questionnaire which is on the T2201 form.

Do you receive Canada Pension Plan disability benefits, workers’ compensation benefits, or other types of disability or insurance? If so, this does not necessarily mean you will qualify for the DTC. These other programs have other purposes and different criteria for qualifying, such as your inability to work. You may not be able to work, however, your daily living may not be severely affected.

The DTC starts from the day the physical or mental impairment began. You can apply at anytime and re-file any tax returns for years that the DTC would apply. For example, you apply for the DTC in 2013 for an impairment that began in 2010; CRA approves the DTC for 2010 and future years. You can now apply for an adjustment for tax years 2010, 2011 & 2012.

Some Definitions

Inordinate amount of time – is a clinical judgment made by a qualified practitioner who observes a recognizable difference in the time required for an activity to be performed by a patient. Usually, this equals three times the normal time required to complete the activity.

Life-sustaining therapy – You must meet both the following conditions: the therapy is required to support a vital function, even if it alleviates the symptoms; and, the therapy is needed at least 3 times per week, for an average of at least 14 hours per week.

Markedly restricted – You are markedly restricted if, all or substantially all of the time (at least 90% of the time), you are unable or it takes you an inordinate amount of time (defined above) to perform one or more of the basic activities of daily living, even with therapy (other than therapy to support a vital function) and the use of appropriate devices and medication.

Prolonged – An impairment is prolonged if it has lasted, or is expected to last, for a continuous period of at least 12 months.

Qualified practitioner – Qualified practitioners are medical doctors, optometrists, audiologists, occupational therapists, physiotherapists, psychologists, and speech-language pathologists. The table below lists which sections of the form each can certify.

Significantly restricted – means that although you do not quite meet the criteria for markedly restricted, your vision or ability to perform a basic activity of daily living is still substantially restricted all or substantially all of the time (at least 90% of the time).

Type of impairment each qualified practitioner can certify:

Qualified practitioner: Can certify: 
Medical doctor All impairments
Optometrist Vision
Audiologist Hearing
Occupational therapist Walking, feeding, dressing, and the cumulative effect for these activities
Physiotherapist Walking
Psychologist Mental functions necessary for everyday life
Speech-language pathologist Speaking

If you find yourself with any kind of a severe impairment, you need to look at the DTC. Currently (2013), the disability amount is $7697, which can be significant. Also, with the amount of children being diagnosed with autism, you can have your child file a T2201 and will more than likely qualify for the DTC, which can then be transferred to one of the parents. Look at other potential disability credits that you may qualify for tax purposes too.

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